Courage and Vulnerability

Brene Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk at TEDxHouston, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. Connection is what gives purpose and meaning to our lives. Brown spent years studying the difference between people who felt connected and those who felt alienated.   This is what she discovered: in order to experience connection, you have to believe you are worthy of it.  Shame is what unravels connection. Shame is the fear of disconnection – unworthiness of connection. People who have a strong sense of love and belonging (connection) believe they are worthy of it. Courage is different from bravery. Bravery is connected to a specific act, courage is an attitude.  The courage to be imperfect. The compassion to be kind to ourselves first, and then kind to others. In order to find connection, we must be willing to be vulnerable. How can we live wholeheartedly? To let ourselves be seen, deeply seen?  To love with our whole hearts? To practice gratitude and joy in the moments when we are terrified? To believe that we are...

Extreme Yoga

A friend sent me this interesting article from the Wall Street Journal. Towards the end (5th paragraph from bottom) the writer mentions that people question whether or not it’s really yoga. My opinion is that only the person doing the practice can determine whether or not they are doing yoga. What do you think? Is yoga a set of practices or a state of mind? Into the Wild With YogaAn extreme athlete with no fixed address is pioneering a new form of yoga. Inside the world of adventure addicts.By ALEXANDRA ALTERApril 5, 2008; Page W1 Jason Magness pulled up to the park in an old sedan stuffed with clothes, climbing gear, books and his Irish punk cassette tapes. He was temporarily homeless after breaking up with his girlfriend but in good spirits. He uncoiled a springy nylon rope, lashed a taut line between two trees and hopped on barefoot. The rope bounced like a trampoline. Then he sat cross-legged in a dead-still lotus posture, suspended 3 feet above the ground. People stopped to stare. From a distance, he looked like he was levitating. Mr. Magness is a charismatic adventurer and yogi with wavy, sun-streaked brown hair, blue-gray eyes and a narrow, tanned face. His exploits have made him a legend in the small underground of adventure sports. He’s also the innovator of slackline yoga and is one of its few masters. More difficult than tightrope walking, it involves holding yoga poses while balanced on a flat rope the width of a thumb. Since he and a friend invented the practice three years ago, Mr. Magness has given demonstrations at...